Tom Garrity

Archive for 2017|Yearly archive page

May 2017

In Life, Uncategorized on June 4, 2017 at 10:20 pm

If you have a bucket list item of traveling to all seven continents in one month, I will try to discourage you. Today, it is June 1, 2017 and I am at my home in Los Ranchos de Albuquerque. The month of May 2017 was a whirlwind of travel that had me on the road more than at home.

Spending time with the Worldcom Public Relations Group at our Annual General Meeting started off my travel with five days in Hong Kong. It was my first time visiting the islands of Kowloon and Hong Kong, second time in Asia.

ProfessiTG HongKongonally, the networking and conversations exceeded expectations. It took the form of exploring parts of the city from the longest series of escalators in the world to betting on horses at the Hong Kong Jockey Club. Personally, I was able to get in a few runs through Kowloon and look to the skyline each night at 8:10 when the horizon lit up with a lazer light show on Hong Kong Island.

The food… well, let me just say there General Tso’s Chicken isn’t on the menu. But, every part of the chicken is available for consumption. The sweet and savory is more my speed. It was a great culinary experience.

Then it was off to Seattle for the annual Counselors Academy Spring ConfeTG Seattlerence. Having chaired the event many years ago in Key West provided the opportunity to lead the organization this calendar year. The area’s food and coffee were on par with the programming of this year’s event (the reading list derived from this event is quite impressive, more in a future post). I was able to get in some nice runs around the area (always a great way to explore and acclimate) and finished up the event at the iconic Space Needle for dinner.

After a bTG Irelandrief reset, it was off on a personal trip to Ireland with my two daughters. It was my first time there. Flew in and out of Dublin, spent nearly all of our time on the west coast. We meandered from Killarney to Newport, seeing the sights on and off the beaten path. While there were so many personal highlight of this trip, I shared those stories to provide business insight from my visit to the Guinness Storehouse factory.
When Arthur Guinness started the brewery in 1759, he signed a 9,000 year lease the four acre factory site at the St. James Gate, in Dublin. The business decision of signing a long (LONG)-term lease for a start-up company would be laughed at today. However, the leadership, persistence, excellence and commitment to bring the “Guinness” vision to life is nothing short of impressive and awe-inspiring.

TG GuinnessAlso, in the “for what it is worth” department, here is information about the status of the 9,000 year lease via Wikipedia:The 9,000-year lease signed in 1759 was for a 4 acre brewery site. Today, the brewery covers over 50 acres, which grew up over the past 200 years around the original 4 acre site. The 1759 lease is no longer valid as the Company purchased the lands outright many years ago.

Some #PR insight for my second cousin, James Comey

In Crisis Communication, Life, Messaging, Reputation, Uncategorized on May 19, 2017 at 6:26 pm

 

The second most polarizing figure in America today is the former Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation James Comey.  Yes, at one point, he was number one, no doubt.

Mr. Comey’s grandmother on his mom’s side and my grandmother on my dad’s side are sisters.  I always knew his grandmother as Aunt Irene.  Mary and Irene Broderick grew up in New York and got along tremendously well. Ensuring that future generations were connected was not on their watch, just a casualty of the nuclear family.

Despite the distance, I am proud of the bloodline that connects our lineage. Yes, I had thought about giving him a call at the office; the potential thought of discussing public relation approaches with my second cousin sounded kind of cool. But in lieu of the awkward telephone handoffs of explaining the family relation for a dozen or so times with federal agents, only to leave a message with a very capable civilian, I opted to put a few of my thoughts on this blog.

As a public relations practitioner for the past 24 years, what insight could I possibly someone who has “been there and done that” in the gauntlet of public opinion?

First, I’d give former FBI Director three quick recaps:

  • The New Yorker story and 60 minutes interview resulted in solid media coverage to share who you are as a person. This is key to creating credibility and likeability.
  • The multiple news announcements about the Clinton e-mail server could have been handled better. While I am convinced that in your mind you were doing the right thing, it came across as disjointed and politically motivated.
  • Conducting an overview briefing to discuss the process for the respective Flynn and Trump/Russia investigations would have helped to shape future media coverage and conversations without giving away any of the investigative findings.

Then I’d ask, “ok, what’s next for you?”  And follow some of these questions (which would surely spur other questions):

  1. What does a win look like? Why?
  2. Where do you want to be professionally three years from now?
  3. How do you want the news headlines to read six months from now, or a year (if you care)?
  4. Are there any pressing issues or public activities taking place within the next 48-72 hours? List them and explain how they might impact the responses to any of the first three questions.

Based on his answers, we’d develop message and a strategy. As a result of that conversation, some exclusive one on one media interviews would be proposed unique to print (New York Times), radio (Michael Smerconish) and television (60 minutes).

Last question that I would ask: tell me about Aunt Irene!

Navigating the Conservative Divide

In Messaging, Uncategorized on March 27, 2017 at 4:39 pm

Foothills

The congressional stalemate over repeal of the Affordable Care Act and the inauguration of the American Health Care Act should not have come as a surprise if perspectives of New Mexico conservatives were taken into consideration.

The increasing split among traditional “republican” institutions like the oil and gas industry or the church and religious organizations are testament to the changing tide of conservatives, akin to Moses’ parting of the Red Sea.

This split, identified in the 2016 Garrity Perception Survey, served not only as a precursor of the national presidential election but also as a guide for what is playing out during the first 100 days of the Trump administration.

While I touched on some of these splits in this May 2016 blog post “A Political Divide as Scenic as the Taos Gorge” , it is important to revisit some of the key items that have surfaced and will surface in some form or fashion.

Medical System – Conservatives are more favorable than those who identify themselves as “somewhat conservative” (SW/C).  Interestingly, according to this quantitative study, liberals and conservatives are aligned in one group just as moderates and somewhat conservatives are aligned.  Insight: National healthcare policy should play to the middle if politicians want to win popular opinion.

Solar/Wind – Conservatives are not favorable toward renewable energy; only 37 percent of residents are favorable toward the industry.  This is in stark contrast to those who identify themselves as SW/C, 55 percent of whom are favorable toward the solar and wind industry. That 18 point divide is significant.  Also, the SW/C and moderates are more aligned than those right of center. Insight: The Trump Administration’s unraveling of the Obama Administration’s Clean Energy Plan should focus on the political middle ground of those favorable toward the solar and wind industry if there is desire of winning public approval.

Church/Religious Institutions – The 19 percentage point split between conservatives (82 percent) and SW/C (63 percent) should be a red flare for how some social issues and belief systems are perceived by New Mexico residents.  Recently, the Catholic Church, under its new papal leadership, has been reaching more towards the middle ground on some hot button language; even if it has just been in its message and tone.  In contrast, some other belief groups have been pushing more to the fringe.  Insight: Public opinion over current and future Republican Supreme Court Nominees, and their ability to successfully navigate the confirmation process, will need to find a way to mimic the tone being exhibited by the Catholic Church when trying to reach the middle ground.

These are interesting times, indeed.  While research provides only a snapshot in time, the glimpse can help elected and appointed officials navigate difficult terrain.